This page gives an overview of the integration used in calculus. The integration involves a "lower limit" shown below C:1 on the D scale, and an upper limit shown below the red index line on the cursor - also on the D scale.
enter value for upper limit  ( ?  ) this is the result of the integration - the area beneath the curve  ( ?  ) ( ?  )  enter value for lower limit
This example shows the slide and cursor position for the upper and lower limits of integration. It also shows those values, as well as the result of the integration within the output boxes. It doesn't show how to get the result using the "Kids Rule!" slide-rule. I'll show you axactly how to do that soon.

Getting the result of the x^2 integration, for some intervals, requires only a single movement of the slide, and only the use of the lower C/D scales! For others, it requires a couple more movements, but still just the C/D scales, while even the most complicated, require just a few movements, plus maybe a look at the A scale if the lower limit is a decimal number. That's all the hints for now.

Click the link below the slide rule to go to the next page after completely studying the content of this page.
click HERE to go to the next page.
- but, please only after studying this page thoroughly!

NOT mobile-phone friendly.
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note: click the left mouse button anywhere on the screen to close this box, and then wait for it to fade away completely before again moving the mouse.

The upper limit of integration being shown here, is point farthest away from 1. Learn more about it here.

In this example, the upper limit must be a bigger number than the one you enter for the lower limit. And, the upper limit can be no larger than 10 for these examples. If you make a mistake, don't worry - I'll fix it when you press the button to get the result.

note: click the left mouse button anywhere on the screen to close this box, and then wait for it to fade away completely before again moving the mouse.

The lower limit of integration being shown here, is point closest to 1. We only make the lowest limit 1 here, because it's easier to work out the result on the slide rule that way. Usually, it can be less than 1, and even less than zero. Learn more about it here.

In this example, the lower limit must be a smaller number than the one you enter for the upper limit, and as mentioned above, it can be no smaller than 1. If you make a mistake, don't worry - I'll fix it when you press the button to get the result.

note: click the left mouse button anywhere on the screen to close this box, and then wait for it to fade away completely before again moving the mouse.

The result of the integration will be shown after you press the green button. The result is the area beneath the x^2 curve. This may all seem really complicated now, but after you study all the pages here discussing integration, I think it will make a whole lot more sense. Did you know that you can find the area inside any section of a square using the integration method? There's a lot of other easier ways to do that sort of thing, but learning how to do it using this type of calculus can make understanding this kind of calculus much easier.

You can't enter anything in the result box, as that is something I do for you. You can also move the slide and/or cursor to see the values in the boxes change too, but that's not ready yet!

Learn more about integration here.